Tag Archives: youth

32 attend recollection in preparation for LUC

SANDAKAN – Thirty-two youth facilitators attended a recollection in preparation for the Let’s Unite Camp (LUC) on 29 July 2018 at St John Paul II Room here.

Organised by the Parish Youth Apostolate, the recollection was facilitated by Anna Teresa Amandus.

The participants came from St Mary’s Cathedral, St Mark and St Peter.

LUC (formerly known as Unite Camp), an annual parish youth programme,  will be held on Aug 23-26 at St Mark Mile 12 Sandakan.

The theme is taken from 1 Corinthians 1:10 – I appeal to you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree and that there be no dissension among you, but that you be united in the same mind and the same judgment – in line with the Diocesan Vision and Mission.

The objective of the camp is to unite the parish youth through a deepened understanding of the faith and knowledge of God with Mary as model.

The recollection began with acknowledging the reality of the community, family, self followed by Mary’s journey of faith till the journey to Emmaus (Christian vocation).

Through undergoing this recollection, the facilitators will be able to help those who will attend LUC later on.  Moreover, friendships will also be strengthened to help each other to stay committed to make LUC a fruitful one. – Sandakan Diocesan Blog

KK Archdiocesan youth aspire to work closely with leaders towards Vision and Mission

Serena Wong (2nd L) is among the youth participating in the PAX Assembly on 13-16 June 2018, Bundu Tuhan Retreat Centre.

BUNDU TUHAN – The youth of Kota Kinabalu Archdiocese aspire to work closely with other leaders  at parish level as well as at archdiocesan level towards attaining the Vision and Mission.

Almost all parish leaders brought with them their youth leaders to the PAX Assembly at Bundu Tuhan Retreat Centre, 13-16 June 2018.

Serena Wong of Sacred Heart Cathedral youth ministry, said she expects to find her call in this PAX process and hopes to respond accordingly pertaining to the vision and mission of the archdiocese.

When asked how the archdiocese can further help the young people to overcome the three critical concerns – apathy, secularisation and political Islam – she said, “There have to be platforms for youth to be participants in the planning, evaluating and implementing the archdiocese’s direction.”

“There has to be a leadership formation for the young people, as succession plan of roles and responsibilities,” she added.

The cathedral parish has seven youth ministries in all three languages. All youth ministries have respectively reported in the Parish Pre-PAX meetings on what have been done and the needs of the young people according to the youth that they minister to and the needs that arise.

They were involved in programmes such as Adoration, talks, retreats and camps to encounter Christ.

Serena said that a Eucharist project is in the pipeline, which will only take place after the election of the new Parish Pastoral Council.

Harold Ong, of St Simon parish, Likas, said to further help the young people to overcome the three main concerns, the archdiocese must work closely with the youth ministry of the individual parishes, raising new leaders, training speakers and resource persons.

He hoped that the archdiocese can see a clearer picture of the challenges faced by parishes and work together as one family of Christ to come out with concrete solutions to remedy issues.

On the involvement of youth in the PAX process, Harold said, “Leaders of our youth ministry participated in the Pre-PAX Assembly on May 1.”

“We also participated in spiritual activities organised by our parish such as Holy Hour and Rosary, outreach to the less fortunate at Cheshire Home in Bukit Harapan, Bible sharing on a weekly basis and a Boys Brigade Company to expose our youths to Catholic Christian values,” said Harold.

On the next plan after PAX Assembly, Harold suggested to “organise an interactive session to learn more about political Islam.”

He said a sharing session is a good platform  for youths to share the experiences of attending a youth event, which promotes faith formation, such as the Diocesan Youth Festival in Tuaran. Linda Edward

Backgrounder: History of Pesta Belia Keuskupan

JBT 2000

The Journey of Diocesan Youth: Youth Camp to Pesta Koir

In 1976, after the formation of Suruhanjaya Belia PAX (SBP), the first programme organised was the ‘Sabah Youth Camp’ in Kionsom, Inanam. The success of the camp prompted SBP to  organise a second camp at the same place in 1977.

The following year, the camp was again held for the third time in Tambunan, and fourth time in Penampang in 1979. These camps aimed at building leadership skills among youths, especially in spiritual leadership.

In the early 80’s, when SBP’s leadership changed  hands, the new line of committee introduced Pesta Koir (PK) to replace Sabah Youth Camp, as the main programme of SBP.

PK was a choir competition between choir groups of each zone under Kota Kinabalu Diocese, which was at that time divided into East Coast zone, North-West Coast, South-West Coast and the Interior.

The first PK was held in 1983 in KK, which was participated by several choir groups.

It was held yearly, and in 1987, the scope of its activities was broadened to include drawing and public speaking competitions. This led to a change in its name from Pesta Koir to Pesta Belia Keuskupan (PBK).

Pesta Koir to Pesta Belia Keuskupan

SBP leadership changed hands for the fourth time in 1989, and the new committee started to re-format its concept.

Their main programme, PBK, was nevertheless retained at that time and was organised only once in two years.

In 1997, SBP started to employ full-time staff and a Diocesan Youth Office was established. That year saw the name Suruhanjaya Belia PAX changed to Tim Pelayanan Belia Diosis (TPBD).

The 10th PBK was held in 1998, as the main programme of TPBD and saw significant changes in its format.

Several new sessions were included such as catechesis, para liturgy, thematic performances, Vigil and Eucharistic celebration with the Bishop.

TPBD succeeded in bringing the environment of ‘World Youth Day’ to the diocesan level. Close to 2,000 young people participated in PBK-10, held in Sandakan.

Two years later, Jubli Agung Tahun 2000 (JBT2000) was celebrated, which saw TPBD KK and Keningau combining  their efforts in organising it. Close to 5,000 Catholic youth participated from the whole of Sabah.

The success of JBT2000 prompted both dioceses to organise a combined Sabah Youth Day (SYD) in Keningau (2004), SYD-2 in Ranau (2008), SYD-3 in Tambunan (2012), and SYD-4 in Tawau (2016), with participation  from Sandakan Diocese also.

PBK-11 resumed in 2010 to give way to these other diocesan events.

After PBK-11, TPBD Agung has decided to hold PBK once in 4 years.

PBK-12 was held in 2014 in Penampang parish. PBK13 Programme Book

Youth gathering concludes with exhortation to be witnesses of the Joy of the Gospel

Participants sing and dance joyfully during the Pesta Belia Keuskupan Ke-13 held on 17-21 June 2018 at St John Tuaran.

TUARAN – Participants of a youth gathering were exhorted to be witnesses of the joy of the Gospel at its conclusion recently.

The 13th Archdiocesan Youth Festival (Pesta Belia Keuskupan Ke-13 or PBK-13) was hosted by St John Tuaran on 17-21 June 2018 at the Dewan Sri Sulaman here.

Franciscan Sister Dora Obod, PBK-13 coordinator, delivered her closing remarks to the 852  participants at the closing ceremony on June 21.

In her speech, she said: “We have been here for four nights and five days, and have celebrated our Catholic faith with the fullness of joy and gratitude through friendship, sharings, and especially in the Mass, where we experienced the seed of the Joy of the Gospel being planted in our heart.”

Sr Dora talked about dreams that surely exist in young hearts, and pointed to them an example they must follow, taking Mary as the model of the faithful follower of Christ who is not afraid to do God’s will.

She asked them to take good care of their hearts and give them to Jesus so that they “will lead a meaningful life.”

Sr Dora exhorted them not to give up in the face of challenges and reminded them to remember that Jesus has conquered the world (cf Jn 16:33).

“This camp is not the end but the beginning, therefore go and be witnesses of the Joy of the Gospel with courage!” she said.

One of the objectives of PBK-13 is that the youth be courageous witnesses of the Joy of the Gospel.

Sr Dora challenged them, “Are you courageous to be witnesses of the Joy of the Gospel in today’s world, in your family, schools, workplace and wherever you may be, and to be Catholic citizens of Sabah and Malaysia?”

The young people gave their resounding ‘Yes!’ to all of these questions. Linda Edward

Focolare youth launch ‘pathways to fraternity’ in genfest

MANILA  – “Pathways to fraternity” was the project launched by over 6,000 young people who participated in the “Genfest,” the international festival of the Focolare Youth Movement held in Manila recently.

The project aimed at “bringing individuals and peoples together so that they can contribute towards building fraternal relationships in the fields of economy, justice, politics, environment, intercultural and interreligious dialogue,” according to Fides correspondent Stefania Tanesini.

The event, organised for the first time in Asia and outside Europe in Manila from 6-8 July 2018, was the eleventh edition of the Genfest, and focused on the theme “Beyond all borders.”  The participants came from 100 countries around the world.

Generally held every six years, the Genfest is organised by the “Youth for a United World” (Y4UW), Focolare’s youth wing. Since its inception in Italy in 1973, the Genfest has become an avenue for young people to show that a united world is possible.

“At a time when migration increases and nationalism gains ground, as a reaction to an exclusively economic globalisation that ignores the diversities of individual cultures and religions, the Genfest has proposed to youth a change of attitude: do not stop at personal, social and political barriers but be ready to accept without fear or prejudice any sort of diversity,” said Maria Voce, President of the Focolare Movement.

The Focolare youth will seek to generate a web of activities targeted at instilling a mentality and a practice of peace and solidarity in their own surroundings and in their countries.

The Genfest was a feast and a commitment at the same time. The message to “overcome borders” was passed on even through the artistic performances, as revealed by the two evening concerts that brought Asia to the rest of the world and vice versa.

Many visited Explo, a multimedia and interactive exhibition that offered a different version of the world’s history based on humanity’s steps towards peace and the centrality of personal commitment to build it. The young participants were even offered the opportunity to “dirty their hands” by choosing to take part in “Hands for Humanity”: twelve activities of solidarity, encounter and urban redevelopment organised in different parts of Manila.

Stories related by young people, who live the drama of migration and segregation, were the highlights of this 11th edition of Genfest. The stories related are of current significance, such as the one of Noé Herrera (Mexico) and Josef Capacio (USA). Both live very near to the border that separates their two countries. Egide and Jean Paul, one from Rwanda and the other from Burundi met during a very dramatic incident that divided the two countries.

Maria Voce proposed three words that are also a life programme for all the youth who now have returned to their countries: “love, start again and share.”   The appeal is “to love the peoples of other countries as you love your own people”; start again without ever losing hope that another world is possible and share personal and collective wealth, resources, and burdens.

She concluded by challenging the young people to “be men and women of unity, people who cherish the treasures of every culture, but who even know how to give them to others, and ultimately be global men and women.”  – Agenzia Fides

Fr Byron’s 10 digital ‘commandments’

Pope Benedict memorably described the Internet as a new Digital Continent in 2009. I had a very enjoyable evening the other night discussing with university students how to be ‘Digital Missionaries‘ in this new continent. We looked at various topics together such as digital discernment, digital navigation and how to avoid digital rocks (so as not to be shipwrecked).

In the end, we all agreed, as we are on a steep learning curve, we need to teach each other how to use these new technologies wisely. Maybe even set up a ‘Digital Accountability Group’ to share ideas etc.

As a group we came up with 10 Digital ‘Commandments’ – here they are:

1 Thou Shall not Text / Message or Comment when you are drunk
No huge explanation needed here, suffice to say that the internet has not learnt to forget or forgive.

2 On the Sabbath day, thou shall take a rest from the digital life
It was agreed that addiction was a real problem, Facebook and Snapchat seem particularly immersive environments where too much time is spent and wasted, non-digital perspectives are increasingly valued.

3 Honour thy friend and ask permission before you tag
With the all-pervasive camera, people’s understanding of what is private and what is public varies wildly, just as we should never assume consent, similarly we should never assume permission. There was a good debate about how realistic this could be.

4 Thou shall cut down on multitasking
This came from a very interesting discussion on Nicholas Carr’s book ‘The Shallows’ – and we all agreed at the end of it that multitasking is junk food for the brain – and the web needs more quality not quantity.

5 Thou must slow down and pause
Practicing digital impulse control is very important, particularly when getting sucked into a flame-war, it is very disedifying to a be a self-righteous Catholic cyberbully (particularly if you are a priest) there’s enough hate out there, let’s not be a counter-sign.

6 Thou shall not gamble/spend online money you do not have
This led to the most heated debate of the night. Some of the students had heard horror stories of people blowing student loans etc. Also as one pointed out, ‘Unless you are looking at leaving uni with a 50k debt, you stop taking credit seriously until the bailiffs knock on your door.

7 Thou shall prioritise speaking to real friends
We discussed the problems of social isolation, particularly acute withdrawal, which is a growing problem on big campuses. We agreed that it is much more effective concentrating on sharing our problems with a few real friends – face to face – over a cup of tea. The students were particularly interested in the MIT professor Sherry Turkle’s writing – such as ‘Alone Together – why we expect more from technology and less from each other’

8 Thou shall avoid ‘false intimacies’
All seemed to agree that when you are lonely, which we all can be, trying to fill the void online led to all sorts of dark places and the risks of blackmail or manipulation seemed to be increasing. This was something where the ability to digitally discern was important.

9 Thou shall be true to thyself
Many friends are projecting false images and lifestyles into their digital lives …. which leads to jealousy, comparing yourself all the time. To be a digital missionary was about integrity, not using a false name, not doctoring images etc.

10 Thou shall be an online peacemaker
There’s a lot of anger out there and we don’t need to add to it!fr tim byron sj / sjsa.wordpress.com

Pope responds to young people’s questions at pre-synodal meeting

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VATICAN CITY – At a pre-Synodal meeting on Monday, 19 Mar 2018, Pope Francis responded to five questions about issues faced by young people from around the world.

How can young people help victims of human trafficking?

Pope Francis was clearly moved by the first question which addressed the reality of sex trafficking. He referred to the stories he has heard from trafficked women about the dangers they face trying to escape their captors. The Pope described this abuse, and even torture, as the “slavery of today.” The Pope went on to denounce the evil of exploiting women. He had especially strong words for baptised Catholics who pay for prostitutes. This is a “crime against humanity,” he said. Pope Francis called on young people to fight for the dignity of women, and concluded by asking forgiveness for all the Catholics who take part in these “criminal acts.”

Where should a young person look for guidance in making life choices?

Pope Francis responded to a young French student seeking direction in his life, by suggesting we confide in those who possess wisdom, regardless of whether they are young or old. “The wise person,” he said, “is the one who is not scared of anything, but who knows how to listen and has the God-given gift of saying the right thing at the right time.” The Pope warned that when young people fail to find their “path of discernment,” they risk shutting themselves off. This can become like carrying a “cancer” inside, he said. And this risks weighing them down and taking away their freedom.

How can we teach young people to be open to their neighbour and to the transcendent?

Pope Francis said education should teach three basic languages: those of the head, the heart, and the hands. The language of the head, he said, means thinking well and learning concrete things. That of the heart means understanding feelings and sentiments. The language of the hands is making use of the gifts God has given us to create new things. The key, he said, is to use all three together. Pope Francis went on to criticise what he called the “isolating nature” of today’s digital, virtual world. Rather than demonise technology, the Pope called it a richness that must be used well with a “concreteness that brings freedom.”

How is a young person preparing for the priesthood to respond to the complexities of present-day culture – like tattoos, for instance?

Pope Francis used this question from a young Ukrainian seminarian to reflect on the priest as a “witness to Christ.”  Clericalism, on the contrary, said the Pope, is “one of the worst illnesses of the Church,” because it confuses the “paternal role of the priest” with the “managerial role of the boss.” He also spoke about the relationship between the priest and the community and how this relationship is compromised, and can be destroyed, by “gossip.” Responding specifically to the question of tattoos, Pope Francis recalled how different cultures have used them to distinguish and identify themselves, so “don’t be afraid of tattoos,” he said – but don’t exaggerate either. If anything, use the tattoo as a talking-point to begin a dialogue about what it signifies.

How can young women religious balance the dominant culture in society and the spiritual life in accomplishing their mission?

The Pope responded to this final question saying that an adequate formation throughout religious life needs to be built on four pillars: formation for an intellectual, communitarian, apostolic, and spiritual life. Having only a spiritual formation leads to psychological immaturity, he said. Even though this is often done to protect young religious from the world, Pope Francis said it is not protection, it is “deformation.”  Those who have not received affective formation are the ones who have ended up doing evil. Allowing people to mature affectively is the only way to protect them.

Pope Francis spoke at the opening session of the 19-24 March 2018 pre-synod meeting, which has drawn some 300 youth from around the world to talk about major themes for the upcoming Synod of Bishops on “Young People, Faith and the Discernment of Vocation.”

Youth in different states in life are in Rome to participate in the event. Priests, seminarians, and consecrated persons are also participating. Special attention will also be given to youth from both global and existential “peripheries,” including people with disabilities, and some who have struggled with drug use or who have been in prison.

At the end of the gathering, notes of the various discussions throughout the week will be gathered into a comprehensive concluding document, which will be presented to Pope Francis and used as part of the “Instrumentum Laboris,” or “working document,” of the October synod. – Vatican News/CNA

Pre-synodal meeting purposes proposed

VATICAN CITY – Final preparations are underway for the 19-24 March 2018, Pre-Synodal Meeting in Rome, organised by the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, in collaboration with the Dicastery for the Laity, Family, and Life.

The Pre-Synodal Meeting will be an important part of the consultation phase before the 15th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on the theme Young people, faith and vocation discernment, scheduled for October 2018.

During a press conference at the Press Office of the Holy See on 15 Mar 2018, Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, Secretary General of the Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, reviewed the purposes of the Pre-Synodal Meeting:

  1. This is an event in which the young will be the actors and the protagonists. We will not only talk about “them”, but they will be telling themselves, with their language, their enthusiasm, and their sensitivity. The next Synod of Bishops wants to be, in fact, not only a Synod “on” young people and “for” young people, but also a Synod “of” young people and “with” young people.
  2. A keyword, repeatedly repeated by the Pope, is “listening”. In this Pre-Synodal Meeting we will listen to young people “live”, “live”, to try to better understand their situation: what they think about themselves and adults, how they live their faith and what difficulties they encounter to be Christians, how they plan their lives and what problems they find in discerning their vocation, as they see the Church today and how they would like it, etc.
  3. Among the young people to be listened to, there will be in particular those that come from situations of hardship and from the “existential outskirts”, young people who often do not have the opportunity to be heard to make their situation and their expectations known. Then there will be young non-Catholics, not Christians and non-believers because listening to young people will be realized as much as possible “at 360 degrees”.
  4. The Pre-Synodal Meeting will be an opportunity to put ourselves in step with the young: keeping in mind that the Synod is by definition a “journey made together”, we want to show what it means concretely to walk together with young people, to all young people excluding.
  5. Walking with young people also means identifying specific pastoral paths, which enable the Christian communities to consolidate their youth pastoral projects, adapting them to the needs of today’s young people.
  6. At the Pre-Synodal Meeting, together with the young people, some parents, educators, priests, pastoral workers and experts of the youth world will take part, to listen to those who live next to the young and have the “tools” to read from the inside and in depth. their situation.
  7. In this way we also want to propose a method of intergenerational exchange and collaboration, fostering dialogue between young people and adults, who often struggle to communicate with each other in everyday life.
  8. The Pre-Synodal Meeting intends to arouse participation dynamics based on the encounter between cultures, living conditions, faiths, and disciplines, developing a model that can be repeated in the different ecclesial realities.
  9. We will ask ourselves how to help young people to seek and find the meaning of their life, in the light of the specific vocational perspective that Pope Francis wanted to give to the Synod journey.
  10. Finally, the Pre-Synodal Meeting will come to elaborate a shared document, which will be delivered to the Pope on Sunday 25 March and, together with the other contributions received, will merge into the Instrumentum laboris, the document on which the Synodal Fathers will meet in October.

While the Pre-Synodal Meeting will have about 300 “in-person” participants, youth from around the world can participant via internet.  More information is available on the meeting website.zenit.org

Vatican encourages youth participation in pre-synod meeting via facebook

World Youth Day in Krakow Poland on 6 July 2016. Credit: Jeff Bruno/CNA

VATICAN CITY – As the pre-synod gathering on youth approaches, Vatican organisers are inviting young people around the globe to join in the discussion through Facebook groups in six different languages.

The 2018 Synod of Bishops on Youth, Faith, and Vocational Discernment will take place this October, but a pre-synod meeting with 315 young people from around the world will take place in Rome from March 19-24.

“With this path the Church wishes to listen to the voices, feelings, faith and even the doubts and critiques of the youth,” Pope Francis said in announcing the pre-synod event.

The goal is to hear from youth worldwide about their lives, situations and challenges, in order to prepare for the gathering of bishops on the topic this fall.

For those unable to attend the pre-synod meeting, Facebook groups have been set up  in six languages for Catholics to share their views. The Facebook groups, which were opened about a month ago, will close on March 16.

All young adults ages 16-29 are invited to virtually participate in the pre-synod meeting. After being accepted into the Facebook group, people will have an opportunity to answers questions which will be summarised and presented to the Holy Father.

To participate, members must have an individual profile, not a page representing an organization, group, or cause. The answers to the questions must also be limited to 200 words or a one-minute video sent to WhatsApp at (+39 342 601 5596).

One question discusses “the vocational sense of life,” asking, “Is there a clear understanding in younger generations of their having a personal call and specific mission in the world?”

On Monday [Mar 19], the pre-synod meeting in Rome will begin with a question-and-answer session with Pope Francis. Then participants will break into groups to discuss a variety of themes, like volunteer work, technology, and politics.

At the end of the gathering, notes of the various discussions will be gathered into one comprehensive concluding document, which will be presented to Pope Francis and used as part of the “Instrumentum Laboris,” or “working document,” of the October synod.

The March event will also include opportunities for prayer, such as praying the Way of the Cross while touring the Roman catacombs of San Callisto, as well as entertainment. Palm Sunday Mass will conclude the week, celebrated by Pope Francis in St Peter’s Square.

The focus of the event is divided into three parts: youth in the world, vocational discernment, and pastoral action.

Youth in the world will focus on defining who the younger generations are and what the culture is around them. The gathering will also discuss the choices the youth have made.

Second, the pre-synod meeting will consider how young adults respond to faith and vocations. It will analyse different vocational paths, the gifts of discernment, and how the Church may best accompany young adults.

Third, it hopes to encourage an inclusive pastoral environment where young people are responsibly involved in the community. It will explore possible tools and places, physical and digital, to aid the faith life of young people.

“This is a step the Church is making to listen to all youth,” said Stella Marilene Nishimwe, a young Burundi woman living in Italy who will be a participant to the pre-synod gathering.

“It will give us an opportunity to say everything that we think. This is an opportunity that we must really take.” – CNA/EWTN News

Updates from the Malaysian Catholic Youth Ministers

SIBU – The Malaysian Catholic Youth Ministers Committee (MCYMC) met in September 2017 at the Sibu Diocese Pastoral Centre.

After their meeting, they presented the following to the young Catholics of Malaysia:

1. All campus students and young working adults migrating from one (arch)diocese to another (arch)diocese are invited to “Check-in” with MCYMC via the ASAYO KL website: https://beliakl.catholicyouth.my/. This will ensure that you will receive pastoral care no matter where you go in the country. We also invite international students who are studying in Malaysia to do the same.

2. In line with the invitation of the Holy Father in preparation for the 2018 Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment, every young person between the ages of 15 to 39 are invited to respond to the survey via the #talk2francisMY. You are also invited to respond to the questionnaire presented by the Synod of Bishops Secretariat. Submission for your responses ends December 2017.

“Jesus looks at you and invites you to go with him. Dear young people, have you noticed this look towards you? Have you heard this voice?…  The Church also wishes to listen to your voice, your sensitivities and your faith, even your doubts and your criticism.” — Letter of His Holiness Pope Francis to the Young People on the occasion of the presentation of the preparatory document of the 15th ordinary general assembly of the synod of bishops.

3. The Biblical Commission and the Youth Commission of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei met in a joint meeting to discuss the Bible and the young people. From the deliberations and sharings among the arch/ dioceses, there is a call to all young people to increase their usage of the Bible in their everyday life and ministries.

4. The Asian Youth Ministers met after the 7th Asian Youth Day in Jogjakarta, from 6-9 August 2017. During this meeting, Youth ministers reflected on Amoris Laetitia, where all were further invited to be more aware of what is happening in our families today whereby Christian values have slowly been forgotten and how these have affected our young people today.

5. The next Malaysian Catholic Campus Students Day will be held in the Archdiocese of Kota Kinabalu in the year 2019. Look out for updates from your respective (Arch)Dioceses in the coming months.

6. World Youth Day 2019 Panama.  The WYD 2019 Malaysian coordinating office will be the Archdiocese of Kota Kinabalu. However, pilgrims who are interested should contact their respective (arch)diocesan representatives/ coordinators as reflected in the poster that is currently in circulation. — Malaysian Catholic Youth Ministers’ Committee 2017, 24 Nov 2017, herald malaysia.com

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