Tag Archives: canonisation

19-year-old Nunzio Sulprizio to be canonised Oct 14

VATICAN CITY – In an Ordinary Public Consistory held on Thursday morning, 19 July 2018, Pope Francis announced that he will canonise Blessed Nunzio Sulprizio on October 14 this year.

Blessed Nunzio Sulprizio was born in Pescosansonesco (Italy) on 13 April 1817 and died in Naples (Italy) on 5 May 1836. He was beatified by Pope Paul VI on 1 December 1963.

He will be canonized along with Blessed Pope Paul VI and Blessed Oscar Romero and four others:

Blessed Francesco Spinelli, diocesan priest and Founder of the Institute of the Sister Adorers of the Blessed Sacrament, who born in Milan (Italy) on 14 April 1853 and died at Rivolta d’Adda (Italy) on 6 February 1913.

Blessed Vincenzo Romano, diocesan priest, who was born at Torre del Greco (Italy) on 3 June 1751 and died there on 20 December 1831.

Blessed Maria Caterina Kasper, Foundress of the Institute of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ who was born on 26 May 1820 in Dernbach (Germany) and died there on 2 February 1898.

Blessed Nazaria Ignazia March Mesa (in religion: Nazaria Ignazia di Santa Teresa di Gesù), Foundress of the Congregation of the Misioneras Cruzadas de la Iglesia Sisters who was born in Madrid (Spain) on 10 January 1889 and died in Buenos Aires (Argentina) on 6 July 1943.

It is fitting that Nunzio Sulprizio, who died at the age of 19, be canonised during the Synod whose theme is Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Now with the addition of Blessed Nunzio, the canonisation will include people from every walk of life: clerical, religious and lay.

Blessed Nunzio was born in Pescosansonesco in Italy in April of 1817. He lost both of his parents while still a child and was brought up by an uncle. His uncle exploited him, not allowing him to go to school, and forcing him to work in his blacksmith shop. Regardless of extreme cold or intense heat, he was forced to carry enormous weights over great distances. He found refuge before the Tabernacle where he would keep Jesus company.

After contracting gangrene in one of his legs, he was sent to a hospital for people with incurable diseases in Naples. He suffered tremendously on account of the pain. Yet, he is known to have said such things as:

Jesus suffered so much for us and by his merits we await eternal life. If we suffer a little bit, we will taste the joy of paradise.
Jesus suffered a lot for me. Why should I not suffer for Him?
I would die in order to convert even one sinner.

When asked who was taking care of him, he would respond: “God’s Providence.”

Once he got better, he dedicated himself to helping other patients. But his health took a sudden turn for the worse. He died from bone cancer in May of 1836 before he reached his 20th birthday. – Sr Bernadette Mary Reis fsp, Vatican News

Oscar Romero and Paul VI to be canonised Oct 14

Pope Paul VI and Abp Oscar Romero pose together in an undated file photo. Photo courtesy of Oficina de Canonizacion de Mons Oscar Romero/CNA

VATICAN CITY – Following a meeting between the Council of Cardinals and Pope Francis on 19 May 2018, the Vatican announced that Bl Pope Paul VI and Bl Oscar Romero will be canonised together on 14 Oct 2018.

During an ordinary consistory on Saturday, Francis decreed that the two blesseds will be canonised alongside four others: Bl Francesco Spinelli, a diocesan priest and founder of the Institute of the Adorers of the Blessed Sacrament; Bl Vincenzo Romano, a diocesan priest from Torre de Greco in Italy; Bl Maria Caterina Kasper, a German nun and founder of the Institute of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ; and Nazaria Ignazia of Saint Teresa of Jesus, founder of the Congregation of the Misioneras Cruzadas de la Iglesia Sisters.

As expected, the canonisations will take place during the 2018 Synod of Bishops on the topic of young people, the faith and vocational discernment, which is set to take place on 3-28 Oct 2018.

The Vatican had announced March 7 that Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Oscar Romero would be canonised following the recognition of a second miracle through their intercession.

Born Giovanni Montini in 1897 in the town of Concesio, Italy, the future Pope Paul VI was ordained a priest at the age of 22. He served as Archbishop of Milan prior to his election as Bishop of Rome in 1963.

As pope, he oversaw much of the Second Vatican Council, which had been opened by Pope St John XXIII, and in 1969 promulgated a new Roman Missal. He died in 1978, and was beatified by Pope Francis on 19 Oct 2014.

Pope Francis himself unofficially confirmed the news of Paul VI’s canonisation during his annual meeting with the priests of Rome Feb 17.

Apart from his role in the council, Paul VI is most widely know for his landmark encyclical Humanae Vitae, which was published in 1968 and reaffirmed the Church’s teaching against contraception in wake of the sexual revolution. This year marks the 50th anniversary the historic encyclical.

Both miracles attributed to Paul VI’s intercession involve the healing of an unborn child.

Bl Oscar Romero, who was beatified by Pope Francis on 23 May 2015, in El Salvador, was the archbishop of the nation’s capital city of San Salvador. He was shot while celebrating Mass on 24 March 1980, during the birth of a civil war between leftist guerrilla forces and the dictatorial government of the right.

An outspoken critic of the violence and injustices being committed at the time, Romero was declared a martyr who was killed in hatred of the faith for his vocal defense of human rights. – Hannah Brockhaus, CNA/EWTN News

Pope Francis approves sainthood for Oscar Romero

A painting of Oscar Romero at the Cathedral of San Salvador (Getty)

VATICAN CITY – Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero will be canonised as a saint, the Vatican confirmed on Wednesday, 7 Mar 2018.

Pope Francis approved the declaration of a miracle attributed to the slain archbishop’s intercession, clearing the way for Romero’s canonisation.

Archbishop Romero was shot dead on 24 March 1980 as he celebrated Mass in a hospital chapel in El Salvador. His murder shocked the world, and came at the height of the country’s civil war. No one has ever been brought to justice for the crime.

Pope Francis decreed in February 2015 that Romero had died for the Catholic faith, before beatifying him in May last year.

Now the Pope has declared that Romero was responsible for the miraculous healing of Cecilia Maribel Flores, who prayed for his intercession while suffering life-threatening complications during a difficult pregnancy.

Pope Francis also approved a miracle for Pope Paul VI, paving the way for his canonisation too.

The Pope now needs to hold a consistory of cardinals to choose the date for the canonisation ceremonies. Cardinal Pietro Parolin said on Tuesday that Paul VI would likely be canonised at the end of the Youth Synod in late October.

Pope Francis also recognised miracles attributed to:

  • Blessed Francesco Spinelli, founder of the Institute of the Sisters Adorers of the Blessed Sacrament
  • Blessed Maria Katharina Kasper, founder of the Institute of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ
  • Blessed Vincenzo Romano, an Italian priest
  • Venerable María Felicia of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, a Paraguayan nun

He also recognised the martyrdom of Anna Kolesárová, and the heroic virtues of:

  • Bernardo Łubieński, professed priest of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer
  • Cecilio Maria Cortinovis (né Antonio Pietro), professed religious of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin
  • Giustina Schiapparoli and Maria Schiapparoli, founders of the Congregation of the Benedictine Sisters of Divine Providence of Voghera
  • Maria Antonella Bordoni, founder of the Little Daughters of the Mother of God
  • Alessandra Sabattini – Catholic Herald

Pope Francis: Paul VI will be a saint this year

Blessed Paul VI (Vatican Media)

VATICAN CITY – “Paul VI will be a saint this year.”

Pope Francis seemed to confirm the imminent canonisation of his predecessor, Paul VI, in a dialogue with Rome’s parish priests earlier this week at the Lateran Basilica.

“There are two Bishops of Rome who are already saints,” he said, referring to the two most recent Popes to be canonised: St John XXIII, and St John Paul II. Over 80 popes are

Over 80 popes are recognised as saints by the Catholic Church. Several others have active “causes” including Pius IX – who, like Paul VI, has already been beatified – and Pius XII, whose “heroic virtues” have been recognised, making him “Venerable.” In his remarks on 15 Feb 2018, Pope Francis mentioned the cause of John Paul I, who is also Venerable, and whose cause is ongoing.

“And [Pope emeritus] Benedict [XVI] and I are on the waiting list,” Pope Francis said, jokingly. “Pray for us!”

In his homily for the closing Mass for the Extraordinary Synod on the Family, during which he had beatified Paul VI, Pope Francis referred to his predecessor as a “great Pope,” and a “tireless Apostle,” courageous in his “humble and prophetic witness of love for Christ and his Church!”

Paul, he said, “before the advent of a secularised and hostile society, he could hold fast, with farsightedness and wisdom – and at times alone – to the helm of the barque of Peter, while never losing his joy and his trust in the Lord.”

Paul VI, he concluded, “truly ‘rendered to God what is God’s’ by devoting his whole life to the ‘sacred, solemn and grave task of continuing in history and extending on earth the mission of Christ,’ loving the Church and leading her so that she might be ‘a loving Mother of the whole human family and at the same time the minister of its salvation’.” – Christopher Wells, Vatican News

Local Carmelite Family celebrates canonisation of Bl Elizabeth of the Trinity

 

thanksgiving-canonisation-2016

KOTA KINABALU – The local Carmelite Family–Carmelite nuns (OCD) and Secular Carmelites (OCDS) celebrated the canonisation of Bl Elizabeth of the Trinity with a thanksgiving Mass on 17 Oct 2016.

Archbishop John Wong presided at the Mass, concelebrated with Fr Rayner Bisius, at the Carmelite Monastery Chapel here.  In his homily, the prelate touched on the special readings and on a brief biography of the new saint.

The simple celebration ended with a breakfast prepared by the Carmelite Seculars for all.

Born Elisabeth Catez on 18 July 1880 in France, she was a gifted pianist with a forceful temper.   Elizabeth sacrificed her music for the “music of silence” when she entered Carmel. Her mystical teaching are encapsulated in the two Retreats she wrote,  as well as her celebrated “Prayer to the Trinity” which reflects its author’s absorption in “The Three” as she termed them, and her love of adoration, silence, peace, conformity to Christ and surrender to the Holy Spirit. So expressive is this “Prayer” that it is also included in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Dying of Addison’s disease on 9 Nov 1906, Blessed Elizabeth’s last words were “I am going to Light, to Love, to Life.”

She was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1984.

Pope Francis canonised her along with four other Blesseds yesterday Oct 16 at the Vatican.  They were Manuel Gonzalez Garcia, a Spanish bishop known for his devotion to eucharistic adoration; Guillaume-Nicolas-Louis Leclerq, a Christian Brother martyred during the September Massacres in Paris after refusing to swear allegiance to the new government following the French Revolution; Lodovico Pavoni, the Italian founder of the Sons of Mary Immaculate, now commonly known as the Pavonians; and Alfonso Maria Fusco, an Italian priest who founded the Congregation of the Baptistine Sisters of the Nazarene.

 

 

 

Mother Teresa has officially been declared a saint!

mother teresa

VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis on Sunday officially declared Mother Teresa of Calcutta a saint of the Catholic Church in front of thousands of pilgrims in St Peter’s Square – a move the entire world has been waiting for.

“For the honour of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul, and our own, after due deliberation and frequent prayer for divine assistance, and having sought the counsel of many of our brother Bishops, we declare and define Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a Saint,” Pope Francis exclaimed on 4 Sept 2016 as the crowd roared with applause.

“We enroll her among the Saints, decreeing that she is to be venerated as such by the whole Church. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.”

Throngs of pilgrims flooded the Vatican on Sept 4 to celebrate the highly anticipated canonisation of Mother Teresa, an event that Catholics and non-Catholics alike have looked forward to since the sister’s death in 1997.

Her canonisation is significant not only because it took place during the Jubilee of Mercy, but also because it fell during a special Sept 2-4 Jubilee celebration for workers and volunteers of mercy, of whom Mother Teresa is widely considered one of the greatest of our time.

Mother Teresa was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu on 26 Aug 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia. The youngest of three children, she attended a youth group run by a Jesuit priest called Sodality, which eventually opened her to the call of service as a missionary sister.

She joined the Sisters of Loreto at age 17 and was sent to Calcutta, where she taught at a high school. After contracting tuberculosis, she was sent to rest in Darjeeling, and it was on the way that she felt what she called “an order” from God to leave the convent and live among the poor.

The Vatican granted her permission to leave the Sisters of Loreto and to live her new call under the guidance of the Archbishop of Calcutta.

After she left her convent, Mother Teresa began working in the slums, teaching poor children, and treating the sick in their homes. A year later, some of her former students joined her, and together they took in men, women, and children who were dying in the gutters along the streets.

In 1950, the Missionaries of Charity were born as a congregation of the Diocese of Calcutta. In 1952, the government granted them a house from which to continue their mission of serving Calcutta’s poor and forgotten.

The congregation quickly grew from a single house for the dying and unwanted to nearly 500 houses around the world.

Mother Teresa set up homes for prostitutes, battered women, orphanages for poor children and houses for those suffering from AIDS.

She was a fierce defender of the unborn, and is known to have said, “If you hear of some woman who does not want to keep her child and wants to have an abortion, try to persuade her to bring him to me. I will love that child, seeing in him the sign of God’s love.”

She died on 5 Sept 1997, and was beatified just six years later by Pope John Paul II on 19 Oct 2003. – CNA/EWTN News

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be made a Saint

mother teresaVATICAN CITY – Blessed Teresa of Calcutta is to be made a Saint. Pope Francis on Thursday, 17 Dec 2015, authorised the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to promulgate a decree regarding a miracle attributed to the intercession of Blessed Teresa (nee Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu).

Blessed Teresa, known around the world as Mother Teresa was born on 26 August 1910 and died on 5 September 1997. She was foundress of the Congregation of the Missionaries of Charity and the Missionaries of Charity.

Other decrees authorised by the Holy Father concerned the heroic virtues of the Servant of God Giuseppe Ambrosoli, professed priest of the Comboni Missionaries of the Heart of Jesus; born 25 July 1923 and died 27 March 1987;

The heroic virtues of Servant of God Adolfo (nee Lanzuela Leonardo Martínez), professed religious of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools; He was born on 8 November 1894 and died 14 March 1976;

The heroic virtues of Servant of God Henry Hahn, Laico; born 29 August 1800 and died on 11 March 1882.

The Pope’s approval for these decrees came during a private audience with Cardinal Angelo Amato SDB, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. – Vatican Radio

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